LR Blog: Growing Sustainability

Link Found Between Pesticides and ADHD in Children

June 2nd, 2010  |  Published in LR Blog: Growing Sustainability

It comes at no surprise that the ubiquitous use of pesticides is not only harmful to the environment, but especially harmful to humanity’s future:  its children.

For years, science has known pesticides (containing organophosphates, also known as “Nerve Gas Relatives” per Radcliffe’s IPM World Textbook) have been associated with adverse effects on neurodevelopment such as behavioral problems and lower cognitive function.  As such, there is a very good reason workers applying pesticides often wear rubber boots and gloves, protective eyewear, suits, and masks; they are protecting their health!

However, previously known scientific findings were based on studies of populations with high levels of exposure such as farm workers, residents of neighborhoods adjacent to industrial farms, and others with fairly regular contact with pesticides such as landscapers. Read the rest of this entry »

A Well-Sited Lawn

April 26th, 2010  |  Published in Around The Neighborhood, LR Blog: Growing Sustainability

grass patch 001 A Well Sited Lawn

This corner provides all the usual suspects to tempt a passing dog:  street lamp, tree, fire hydrant and a luxurious 2′ square patch of lawn.  This was irrigated with 2 5′ spray heads.

SF Flower & Garden Show 2010

April 8th, 2010  |  Published in LR Blog: Growing Sustainability

The display gardens at this year’s show were an exciting collection of imaginative and progressive landscapes with an emphasis on “Gardens for the Future”.

Here are just a few shots of some display gardens with more to come…

sfflower 003 SF Flower & Garden Show 2010 Read the rest of this entry »

Nasty Effects of Wront Plant, Wrong Place

March 24th, 2010  |  Published in Around The Neighborhood, LR Blog: Growing Sustainability

For years I’ve watched a beautiful Quercus agrifolia, Coast Live Oak, slowly decline in a garden in Santa Barbara.  The owners have a hodgepodge of Algerian Ivy, Vinca, Calla Lillies and other “random acts of planting” under the canopy.

Arborists continue to visit the home and “tend” to the tree by addressing symptoms (removing sick limbs, applying fertilizers, etc.) as opposed to tackling the real problem of  over-watering and summer watering. Have the arborists or homeowners looked across the street into the dry creek where countless oaks are thriving without a doctor-patient relationship?

Unfortunately, I don’t think they have because just yesterday, the stakes were raised and chemical war was launched against this old Oak.

chem 001 Nasty Effects of Wront Plant, Wrong Place  Read the rest of this entry »

Rio Lindo Elementary School: Conceptual Plan

February 10th, 2010  |  Published in Community Service Project

rio thumb 0051 Rio Lindo Elementary School: Conceptual Plan

In order to provide a point of reference to begin conversations, Landscape Resource, in conjunction with RMLA of Santa Barbara, prepared a Conceptual Plan for the school garden.  This plan will act as a reference during intial meetings to help determine if the correct program elements are included, the spacial arrangements are functional and acceptable to the maintenance staff, and to be used while generating preliminary cost estimates that will drive fundraising efforts and School Board approvals.

 

Rio Lindo Elementary School Native and Edible Garden Project

February 5th, 2010  |  Published in LR Blog: Growing Sustainability

rio heading 001 Rio Lindo Elementary School Native and Edible Garden Project

Located on the windswept Oxnard plains (just south of Ventura), Rio Lindo is one of eight schools within the Rio District.  The school’s twenty-two classrooms serve over 500 pre-school and elementary students who all embrace the school’s motto:  “The Sky is the Limit”.

The school is tucked into a typical California suburban subdivision whose monoculture of lawn and clipped juniper greet the students and staff each day.  Due to budget limitations, the school’s grounds are composed of a vast amount of turf, small planter beds, and even smaller amount of plant diversity.  In an education system where many teachers are forced to buy basic supplies for students, surely there is tragically very little to no resources available for improving the exterior character of a school.  So unfortunately, the students currently do not have the opportunity to watch seasonal change, pick fresh tomatoes, or understand the basic compost cycle. Read the rest of this entry »